Thursday, July 20, 2017

From the Mail Bag... A Veiled Threat

Once again I have received a communication from a reader complaining about my vocal opinions about Trump, and suggesting it could impact the sales of my books.

Here's what I received:

Hi Sue, I love your books, and that will not change my opinion of your writing. But I am very tired of people, such as yourself, who are in the public eye denigrating our president. I view authors as celebrities, and I feel they should walk a fine line. I know you have another job, not just writing. But there are a lot of people, I know that love your books, but would not hesitate buying something else. If you were making your living just by writing, could you afford to alienate people who voted for the person they thought is best? The joke was cute, your comment was not. Everybody needs to laugh at themselves. I never make it a habit to make jokes about others, you know "glass houses" and all.
 
Here is my response:

[Y]ou are certainly entitled to your opinion (and I will fight for your right to it), but I couldn't disagree with you more. As an individual, a writer, a paralegal, a citizen, etc., I am entitled to air my opinion out in public. There is no fine line I should be walking, nor will I. I feel it's my duty to be vocal about things I think are wrong and Trump is near the top of my list. I totally respect the office of the presidency, but I do not, nor will I ever, respect him and what he is doing to this country. If people want to not buy my books because of that, then they are free to not buy them. And I would feel this way even if I were earning my living 100% from them. A lot of authors keep their opinions to themselves out of fear of not selling a book or two. That's their decision. But many authors don't - check out Stephen King, Chuck Wendig, Jeri Westerson, Tim Hallinan, Margaret Atwood, Jan Burke, just to name a couple, and there are more, many more who do not let that fear rule their opinons. If you want to chide a "celebrity", use your energy to go after those abusing animals, beating on women, getting off scott-free after drunk driving. Those folks need to be walking not a "fine line" but a "moral line. "

(Yes, I know there are typos, but this is how it was sent, so deal with it.)
 
Then this arrived:
 
I think your response to me was harsh. I do not like celebrities, I do not watch Television, nor do I go to concerts, or movies. We, the hard working, middle class pay their salaries. They are pariah, for the most part. I do go after people abusing any animals and children, people that cannot take care of themselves. I do not support women who let themselves be a victim.
 
Side note: I find it interesting  that this person is willing to stand up against abuse, except that against women. At least this is how that reads to me. It reads as if this person, a woman BTW, thinks abused women are allowing themselves to be a victim, therefore are not worthy of support or protection. Talk about "harsh."
 
On the heels of the above message, came this:
 
I am not going to read anymore of your books, I am unfriendliness you now, and our libraries don't carry your books neither does our Barnes and Noble. So I guess you are not that important after all.
 
She must think she hit my jugular here. Sorry to disappoint, because she missed it entirely. And she did "unfriendliness" me. I checked later.
 
My final reply:
 
You just proved that you are an intolerant individual. I always welcome opinions opposite mine. You, apparently, do not. Still I will keep my mouth open in defense of your freedoms. You're welcome.
 
When I participated in the Women's March, I had people unfriending me and vowing not to buy my books any longer. That didn't phase me and neither will this.

I have lots of friends who hold opinions opposite mine, and who even voted for Trump. We are still friends because I believe they are entitled to their opinion. On my Facebook page, I never block anyone making comments in opposition to one of my posts. What will get someone blocked is being nasty or picking a fight. And I have blocked people who agree with me on things, as well some who disagree with me, for those reasons.

But a word to anyone reading this who thinks sending a message like this to an author, an actor, or even the pastor down the street, will make them change their mind: It won't.  And if it will, then their convictions are truly soggy and worthless.

Minds are changed by facts and truth, not by threats.
 
 

Saturday, July 15, 2017

The Great Outdoors Is Calling My Name... Sort Of

Due to all kinds of things happening in my life, I'm back to Plan A when it comes to buying my RV. That means I will buy it closer to when I retire in early 2019, meaning I will buy it closer to the time I can actually use it.  I had wanted it NOW. NOW. NOW. But when things didn't work out the way I wanted them, I took a step back and assessed the situation. I'm now looking at this set back as the Universe telling me my timing for the RV was off. Way off.

Ok, I'm listening. Don't have to hit me in the face twice!

But here's the thing, while I'm waiting (somewhat) patiently for my new RV buying date to roll around, I've been bitten by the urge to spend more time outdoors. Yes, outdoors. In nature, surrounded by trees, babbling brooks, sunny skies, and clean air. And ticks, mosquitoes, spiders, and possibly even bears. Yeah, that outdoors.

As I confessed in my last blog about camping, I'm about as outdoorsy as chintz curtains. To me, RVing in a lovely camper van with all the amenities of my apartment (and some much nicer), is my idea of camping.  But lately I've been hanging out online with some hardcore campers and hikers and I'm starting to see things through their eyes and their gorgeous photos.  Now I want to get out there, with or without an RV, and hike.

Holy shit, did I just say I want to go hiking?

Nah, must be the Los Angeles street fumes I'm sniffing as I write this.

But, yes, it's true, I want to start spending more time outdoors, even before I travel in my future RV. So I'm thinking shortly after I finish the book I'm working on, I'll tackle a few easy local trails to get me started, then branch out from there. I have the shoes and hiking poles and proper clothes. I even have a tick key. (Yes, that's a thing.) When I was training for the Camp Pendleton Mud Run eight years ago, I would hike 4-6 miles most weekends.  And walk 3 miles a day at least 2-3 times a week.Then again, I was younger and pounds lighter.

Still, I know I can do this.

And I want to do this. I really do!

I'm tired of being a couch potato. Or should I say a computer potato?

I also have reservations at a hotel in Cayucos around Christmas to celebrate my 65th birthday, and plan on hiking there and around Morro Bay during those days.

Oh, and BTW, just because I'm ready to hike, it doesn't mean I'm going to eventually sleep on the ground in a tent. I have to draw a line against this craziness somewhere! But the truth is, I'm afraid once I'm down on the ground, I wouldn't be able to get up!

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

A Summer Reading Challenge

Today is the 4th of July. Our nation's birthday. A time for celebration, cookouts, fireworks, parades and gathering with friends and family. But I'm thinking about something else today. I'm thinking about my summer reading.

Never in my life has the 4th of July meant more to me than it does this year. Why? Because I genuinely feel that our rights as American citizens are in peril by what is going on in our current government.  We are facing a serious crisis in this country. We are under siege, both as a people and as individuals. Our rights are being threatened. The environment is being threatened. The future of those coming after us is being threatened. We have people in power hell-bent on stripping us down to our skivvies while they make millions in profit.

But none of this is news. And you've certainly heard me rant about this before. But today I'm not here to rant and rave about our federal government. Today I'm posing a challenge... to YOU.

When was the last time you read the U.S. Constitution?  Seriously!  Have you ever read it? Can you remember the last time? It was probably in school.

Until today, the last time I read it was 24 years ago. I was visiting D.C. and seeing all the usual tourist spots: Smithsonian Museum, the Treasury, the Holocaust Museum, the Capitol, etc.  It was a wonderful trip, saturating me with history and government institutions. I love that stuff. It brings out my inner nerd.

One of my stops was the National Archive Museum, specifically the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom. This permanent exhibit houses The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution, and The Bill of Rights. You can't touch them, of course, but you can read them. I didn't expect to spend much time there (think Chevy Chase checking out the Grand Canyon in National Lampoon's Vacation), but as I started looking at these documents, drafted and signed so many years ago, I found myself moved to the point of tears.  I ended up going back to the beginning of the exhibit and reading every word.

I can honestly say, it changed how I felt about my country and my role in it, spurring me to go from bystander to active participant.

So my summer challenge to you is to read the Constitution. And I'll even make it easy on you.

Here is the full text of the Constitution of the United States.