Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Diary of a Deadline - More Please

Today I went to my editor at Midnight Ink, gruel bowl in hand like Oliver Twist, and asked for more time to get my manuscript for Odelia #10 done.  Being the understanding person she is, she gave me a couple of more weeks.

In spite of my diligence, the book is not ready. It's close, but you can't turn in close.  Truth is, I could probably get it done by my deadline next week, but I know it would not be up to my usual standards. The manuscript will be done, but the kinks will not be ironed out.

My plan is to turn it in earlier than October 22nd, my new deadline date. You see, I have another book lined up behind it and that book is tapping its foot with impatience.  It's the 6th book in my Ghost of Granny Apples series and it has a working title of GHOST WRITER. It's due in mid-March. So, extension or not, I cannot lollygag.

Tip of the Day:
If you legitimately need an extension, ask for it,
but don't take advantage of it.
I often ask for extensions on initial manuscripts, usually to do a last minute polish. Only once do I recall needing a long or second extension and that was due to illness. Usually all I need is just a week or so more. When it comes to other deadlines, like turning in copy edits, I always hit the mark, sometimes even early.

Often new authors wonder why a publisher needs a manuscript 9-12 months ahead of a book's release date.  Never forget that publishers have deadlines on their end too. They have covers to work up and catalogues to prepare and PR campaigns to plan, all done nearly a year before the book is printed. Getting a book out has many moving parts and involves a lot of people, and if you, the author, don't hold up your end, it throws everything out of kilter for many.

An author once bragged to me that she was four months past her deadline on one of her books. She didn't seem concerned at all. The last time I spoke with her, her publisher had canned her. Get the drift.

There are authors who can drag out deadlines for a long time and survive. Those are usually the top sellers. Those authors at the very top of the food chain who bring in millions for their publishers, but even then I'll bet they don't do it often. Those of us who are mid-listers or those just starting out do not have that luxury.

It's also extremely unprofessional.

So I now have a reset on the time clock for JUNK IN THE TRUNK!


That doesn't mean I'll be goofing off this weekend.  I have some personal stuff that came up that needs my attention. After that, it will be all Odelia all the time, or damn close to it.

1 comment:

Christopher Hudson said...

All the best! Keep pluggin'.